how many pull ups can a rock climber do

The Benefits of Pull-Ups

Pull-ups are a great way to improve your upper body strength and they can also be a great addition to your cardio workout. Pull-ups are a compound exercise, which means they work multiple muscle groups at the same time. They are also a great way to build grip strength, which is important for rock climbers.

Improved grip strength


A rock climber’s grip strength is typically one of their first concerns. The fear of losing your grip and falling is ever present, especially when starting out. Pull-ups are a great exercise to build the muscles in your arms and hands that are key for maintaining a good grip. As your grip strength improves, so will your confidence on the wall.

Increased forearm and bicep size

One of the benefits of doing pull-ups is increased forearm and bicep size. When you do a pull-up, you’re not just working your back — you’re also working your forearms and biceps. Your grip has to be strong enough to keep you from falling, so you’re basically doing a forearm and bicep workout every time you do a pull-up.

Improved latissimus dorsi development


One of the primary benefits of doing pull-ups is the development of the latissimus dorsi, more commonly known as the lat or lats. This large, flat muscle runs from the bottom of your scapula (shoulder blade) down to your lower back, and is responsible for drawing your arm down and back.

When you do a pull-up, your lats are working hard to raise your body up against gravity. As you get stronger and are able to do more reps, you’ll notice that your lats become more defined and pronounced. In addition to making you look good, strong lats are also important for functional strength and can help prevent injuries.

How to Do a Pull-Up

Grasp the bar with an overhand grip

To do a basic pull-up, grab the bar with your palms facing forward and space your hands about shoulder-width apart. stretch your arms out fully so that your body is extended. This is the starting position. Bend your knees and cross your feet behind you.

Hang from the bar with your arms fully extended

Hang from the bar with your arms fully extended and your feet off the ground. Slowly pull yourself up until your chin is above the bar. Lower yourself back down to the starting position and repeat.

Pull yourself up until your chin is above the bar


Start by standing underneath the pull-up bar with your feet shoulder-width apart. Reach up and grab the bar with your palms facing away from you, and position your hands shoulder-width apart. Hang from the bar with your arms fully extended.

From this position, begin pulling yourself up until your chin is above the bar. Concentrate on using your back and arm muscles to lift yourself up, and resist the temptation to swing or kick your legs for momentum. Once your chin is above the bar, slowly lower yourself back to the starting position.

The Different Types of Pull-Ups

Pull-ups are a great way to build upper body strength. They can be done with a variety of grip styles, and each grip style targets different muscles. The most common grip styles are the supinated grip, the pronated grip, and the mixed grip.

Standard Pull-Up


The standard pull-up is the most common type of pull-up, and is performed with an overhand grip, with your palms facing away from you. This grip works the entire back, as well as the biceps. Standard pull-ups are a great exercise for beginner and intermediate rock climbers.

Wide-Grip Pull-Up


The wide-grip pull-up is a variation of the standard pull-up. As the name suggests, the main difference is in the grip. Instead of placing your hands shoulder-width apart, you place them slightly wider. This targets your latissimus dorsi (lats) more than the standard pull-up, making it an excellent exercise for building back width.

The wide-grip pull-up is a compound exercise, meaning it works multiple muscle groups at the same time. In addition to your lats, it also targets your biceps, shoulders, and core.

Close-Grip Pull-Up


The close-grip pull-up is a great exercise for targeting the inner lats, as well as the biceps.To perform the close-grip pull-up, simply grip the bar with your hands close together—about shoulder-width apart. From there, follow the same instructions as above.

Reverse-Grip Pull-Up

The reverse-grip pull-up is a common variation of the standard pull-up. As the name suggests, it involves gripping the bar with your palms facing away from you.

This exercise targets your latissimus dorsi – the large, wing-like muscles that run down either side of your back – to a greater extent than a regular pull-up. It also challenges your biceps and forearm muscles more, making it a good exercise for developing overall upper-body strength.

If you’re new to reverse-grip pull-ups, start by using an assisted machine or bands to help you get used to the movement. Once you’ve built up some strength and confidence, try doing them without any assistance.

The Muscles Used in Pull-Ups

Pull-ups work several muscle groups in your back, shoulders, and arms. They are an excellent compound movement to add to your upper-body routine. However, they are not easy to do. In fact, most people cannot do a single pull-up. If you can do a pull-up, you are already ahead of most people. Let’s take a look at the muscles used in pull-ups.

Latissimus dorsi

The latissimus dorsi, often called the “lats,” are the large, flat muscles that run down the sides of your back. They attach to the bottom of your shoulder blades and all the way down to your lower back. When you do a pull-up, your lats are responsible for pulling your body up to the bar.

Biceps

The biceps are the primary muscles used in pull-ups. The biceps are responsible for bending the elbow and bringing the hand towards the shoulder. Additionally, the biceps help to stabilize the shoulder joint and keep the elbow from moving during the exercise.

Forearms

Your forearm muscles — particularly the brachioradialis — are key in doing pull-ups. The brachioradialis is a long muscle that runs from the bottom of your upper arm to the top of your forearm. This muscle is responsible for bending your wrist up and down, and it also helps stabilize your elbow joint. Other muscles in your forearm — such as the extensors and flexors — also help with movement at the wrist and elbow.

How Many Pull-Ups Can a Rock Climber Do?

Rock climbers are some of the most physically fit people on the planet. They have to be able to do a lot of pull-ups to be successful at their sport. So, how many pull-ups can a rock climber do?

The world record for the most pull-ups in 24 hours is 4,025

On May 22-23, 2015, Demetri “Coup” Cherkas set the world record for the most pull-ups in 24 hours with a mind-blowing 4,025 reps. That averages out to 168 pull-ups per hour!

The world record for the most pull-ups in one hour is 722

This is held by Jan hejda from the Czech Republic who set the record on May 8, 2015. pull-ups are a demanding endurance exercise that many rock climbers use as training to supplement their rock climbing. Most people can only do a handful of pull-ups at a time, making this world record all the more impressive.

Share:

Facebook
Twitter
Pinterest
LinkedIn
On Key

Related Posts

what to wear rock climbing outside

what to wear rock climbing outside

Looking to take your rock climbing outside? Here’s what to wear to make sure you’re comfortable and safe while scaling new heights. What to wear

how to wash climbing rope

how to wash climbing rope

Have you ever wondered how to wash your climbing rope? Well, wonder no more! In this blog post, we will explore the best ways to